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Advanced Configuration of booster-http

Customizing your booster-http instance
Before proceeding any further, we suggest you read about the basics of HTTP retrieval with booster-http. This section is an extension of HTTP retrievals and deals with advanced configuration options.

Configuration options

booster-http is an independent process that can be run on the same machine as boostd or on a different machine. Multiple instances can also be run with different listen addresses if required.
--pprof run pprof web server on localhost:6070 (default: false)
--base-path value the base path at which to run the web server
--address value, --addr value the listen address for the web server (default: "0.0.0.0")
--port value the port the web server listens on (default: 7777)
--api-lid value the endpoint for the local index directory API, eg 'http://localhost:8042'
--add-index-throttle value the maximum number of add index operations that can run in parallel (default: 4)
--api-fullnode value the endpoint for the full node API
--api-storage value [ --api-storage value ] the endpoint for the storage node API
--serve-pieces enables serving raw pieces (default: true)
--serve-cars serve CAR files with the Trustless IPFS Gateway API (default: true)
--compression-level value compression level to use for responses, 0-9, 0 is no compression, 9 is maximum compression; set to 0 to disable if using a reverse proxy with compression (default: 1)
--log-file value path to file to append HTTP request and error logs to, defaults to stdout (-) (default: "-")
--tracing enables tracing of booster-http calls (default: false)
--tracing-endpoint value the endpoint for the tracing exporter (default: "http://tempo:14268/api/traces")
--api-filter-endpoint value the endpoint to use for fetching a remote retrieval configuration for requests
--api-filter-auth value value to pass in the authorization header when sending a request to the API filter endpoint (e.g. 'Basic ~base64 encoded user/pass~'
--badbits-denylists value [ --badbits-denylists value ] the endpoints for fetching one or more custom BadBits list instead of the default one at https://badbits.dwebops.pub/denylist.json (default: "https://badbits.dwebops.pub/denylist.json")
--help, -h show help

booster-http, boostd and lotus

booster-http must have network, or localhost access to a full lotus node, a lotus-miner and a LID instance. The following options are required:
  • --api-lid - the Local Index Directory (LID) service endpoint
  • --api-fullnode - the lotus full node API endpoint, discoverable by running lotus auth api-info --perm=admin
  • --api-storage - the lotus-miner API endpoint, discoverable by running lotus-miner auth api-info --perm=admin

Address and port

--address and --port configure the listen address and port of the booster-http server. By default HTTP server will listen on 0.0.0.0:7777. This can be set to other addresses and ports as required, e.g. 127.0.0.1 to serve localhost-only if running a reverse-proxy on the same server with a public listen address.

Pieces and CARs

--serve-pieces is enabled by default and allows retrieval of raw pieces on the /piece/ endpoint of your booster-http server. Requests for pieces require the full piece CID appended to /piece/.
Piece retrieval is typically performed to replicate deals, or by clients that are able to decode raw piece data.
--serve-cars is enabled by default and allows IPFS Trustless Gateway retrievals on the /ipfs/ endpoint. This is not a full "trusted" gateway, and requests must either ask for CARs containing one or more blocks from a root CID, or raw block bytes for a single CID. Requests can either pass an Accept: application/vnd.ipld.car header, or a ?format=car query parameter for CAR data. Or, to download raw single IPLD block bytes, either an Accept: application/vnd.ipld.raw header, or a ?format=raw query parameter.
A trustless retrieval client is recommended for performing and verifying retrievals from booster-http. See Lassie for more information. Providing Lassie with the --provider http://{booster-http exposed url} will perform verified, trustless retrievals to your booster-http instance.

BadBits denylist

booster-http (and booster-bitswap) automatically filter out known flagged content using the denylist maintained at https://badbits.dwebops.pub/denylist.json. Use one or more --badbits-denylists flags to point to a custom, valid BadBits denylist and override the default.

Compression

By default, booster-http will compress responses with gzip compression. --compression-level can be set between values of 0 and 9, where 0 is no compression and 9 is maximum compression. The default value is 1, which optimises for speed over compression ratio but this may be increased if required.
Compression can be disabled by setting --compression-level 0. If you are running a reverse proxy, such as NGINX, in front of booster-http that performs compression, you should disable compression in booster-http to avoid double-compression.

Logging

booster-http logs HTTP requests and errors to stdout by default. This can be overridden with --log-file to log to a file instead. The log file format is similar to typical NGINX or Apache log file formats and is suitable for ingestion into log aggregation tools such as Splunk or ELK. The format is as follows:
%s %s %s "%s" %d %d %d %s "%s" "%s"
Where the elements are:
  1. 1.
    RFC 3339 timestamp
  2. 2.
    Remote address
  3. 3.
    HTTP Method
  4. 4.
    Request path
  5. 5.
    Response status code
  6. 6.
    Response duration (in milliseconds)
  7. 7.
    Response size
  8. 8.
    Compression ratio (or - if no compression)
  9. 9.
    Remote user agent
  10. 10.
    Error (or "" if no error)
When using a reverse proxy, log output from the reverse proxy may be more suitable for storage and analysis than booster-http logging.

Trusted HTTP Gateway Setup

Where a Storage Provider wishes to serve plain files, including streaming video, audio and other media, a trusted HTTP gateway can be used to translate booster-http's trustless data into trusted data. This is a separate process that must be configured to communicate with booster-http.
Be aware that trusted HTTP responses typically do not count as "successful" retrievals by reputation systems and other retrieval checkers. It is also not possible to use trusted HTTP gateways to retrieve CAR files, which are required for verified retrievals by clients such as Lassie which is a recommended client for Filecoin downloads. When enabling trusted HTTP gateways, it is recommended to also enable the trustless CAR gateway to allow CAR retrievals; this includes via reverse proxies (see below).

bifrost-gateway

bifrost-gateway is an IPFS Trusted Gateway server that can be used to translate booster-http's trustless data into trusted data. bifrost-gateway is a separate process that must be configured to communicate with booster-http.
When running bifrost-gateway, two environment variables must be set:
  • PROXY_GATEWAY_URL=http://{booster-http exposed url} to point to the booster-http address (without path)
  • GRAPH_BACKEND=true to instruct bifrost-gateway to perform full CAR retrievals rather than individual IPLD block retrievals for efficiency
Additionally, --gateway-port may be used to override the default listen port of 8081.
PROXY_GATEWAY_URL=http://localhost:7777 GRAPH_BACKEND=true bifrost-gateway
curl --output /tmp/museum.jpg "http://localhost:8081/ipfs/bafybeidqindpi4ucx7kmrtnw3woc6jtl7bqvyiokrkpbbuy6gs6trn57tm/vincent/Vincent%20van%20Gogh_files/Caf%C3%A9tafel_met_absint_-_s0186V1962_-_Van_Gogh_Museum.jpg"
% Total % Received % Xferd Average Speed Time Time Time Current
Dload Upload Total Spent Left Speed
100 11830 100 11830 0 0 140k 0 --:--:-- --:--:-- --:--:-- 175k
open /tmp/museum.jpg
A reverse proxy can be configured to talk to bifrost-gateway, but be aware that IPFS gateway's are typically exposed on the /ipfs/ endpoint, which is also the endpoint of the trustless gateway which is required for standard Filecoin retrievals (e.g. using Lassie). A reverse proxy combining both the booster-http trustless endpoint and a bifrost-gateway trusted endpoint must be configured to route /ipfs/ requests to booster-http where the Accept header contains application/vnd.ipld.car or application/vnd.ipld.raw, and /ipfs/ requests to bifrost-gateway where the Accept header contains anything else, such as text/html or */*. Alternatively, separate reverse proxies may be configured for both booster-http and bifrost-gateway.

Reverse Proxy Setup

Storage Providers should secure their booster-http before exposing it to the public. Storage Providers may use any tool available to limit who can download files, the number of requests per second, and the download bandwidth each client can use per second.
NGNIX is one such reverse proxy which may be used in front of a booster-http instance. This section provides only a basic coverage of the ways in which NGINX can set access limits, rate limits and bandwidth limits. In particular it’s possible to add limits by request token, or using JWT tokens. The examples in this section are adapted from Deploying NGINX as an API Gateway which goes into more detail.
By default NGINX puts configuration files into /etc/nginx
The default configuration file is /etc/nginx/sites-available/default

Setup server block

In this example, we are setting up an NGINX server listen on port 7575 and forward requests to booster-http on port 7777.
The IPFS Trustless Gateway serves content from /ipfs/ and the piece retrieval endpoint is /piece/. A location block that matches both of these paths will forward requests to booster-http.
# ipfs gateway config
server {
listen 7575 default_server;
listen [::]:7575 default_server;
location ~* ^/(ipfs|piece)/ {
proxy_pass http://127.0.0.1:7777;
}
}
Alternatively, to only forward /ipfs/ requests to booster-http our location directive can be simplified:
location /ipfs/ {
proxy_pass http://127.0.0.1:7777;
}

Limiting Access

We can limit access to the IPFS gateway using the standard .htaccess file. This file contains usernames and passwords. In this example we create a user named alice:
mkdir /etc/nginx/ipfs-gateway.conf.d
htpasswd -c /etc/nginx/ipfs-gateway.conf.d/.htpasswd alice
New password:
Re-type new password:
Adding password for user alice
Include the .htaccess file in the /etc/nginx/sites-available/default
# ipfs gateway config
server {
listen 7575 default_server;
listen [::]:7575 default_server;
location ~* ^/(ipfs|piece)/ {
# htaccess authentication
auth_basic "Restricted Server";
auth_basic_user_file /etc/nginx/ipfs-gateway.conf.d/.htpasswd;
proxy_pass http://127.0.0.1:7777;
}
}
Now when we open any URL under the path /ipfs/ we will be presented with a Sign-in dialog.
Login prompt when accessing `booster-http` url

Rate Limiting

To prevent users from making too many requests per second, we can add rate limits.
  1. 1.
    Create a file with the rate limiting configuration at /etc/nginx/ipfs-gateway.conf.d/ipfs-gateway.conf
  2. 2.
    Add a request zone limit to the file of 1 request per second, per client IP
limit_req_zone $binary_remote_addr zone=client_ip_10rs:1m rate=1r/s;
  1. 3.
    Include ipfs-gateway.conf in /etc/nginx/sites-available/default and set the response for too many requests to HTTP response code 429
include /etc/nginx/ipfs-gateway.conf.d/ipfs-gateway.conf;
server {
listen 7575 default_server;
listen [::]:7575 default_server;
location ~* ^/(ipfs|piece)/ {
# htaccess authentication
auth_basic "Restricted Server";
auth_basic_user_file /etc/nginx/ipfs-gateway.conf.d/.htpasswd;
limit_req zone=client_ip_10rs;
limit_req_status 429;
proxy_pass http://127.0.0.1:7777;
}
}
  1. 4.
    Click the refresh button in your browser on any path under /ipfs/ more than once per second you will see a 429 error page.
HTTP error 429

Bandwidth Limiting

It is also recommended to limit the amount of bandwidth that clients can take up when downloading data from booster-http. This ensures a fair bandwidth distribution to each client and prevents situations where one client ends up choking the booster-http instance.
  1. 1.
    Create a new .htaccess user called bob
htpasswd /etc/nginx/ipfs-gateway.conf.d/.htpasswd bob
  1. 2.
    Add a mapping from .htaccess username to bandwidth limit in /etc/nginx/ipfs-gateway.conf.d/ipfs-gateway.conf
map $remote_user $bandwidth_limit {
default 1k;
"alice" 10k;
"bob" 512k;
}
  1. 3.
    Add the bandwidth limit to /etc/nginx/sites-available/default
include /etc/nginx/ipfs-gateway.conf.d/ipfs-gateway.conf;
server {
listen 7575 default_server;
listen [::]:7575 default_server;
location ~* ^/(ipfs|piece)/ {
# htaccess authentication
auth_basic "Restricted Server";
auth_basic_user_file /etc/nginx/ipfs-gateway.conf.d/.htpasswd;
limit_rate $bandwidth_limit;
limit_req zone=client_ip_10rs;
limit_req_status 429;
proxy_pass http://127.0.0.1:7777;
}
}
  1. 4.
    To verify bandwidth limiting, use curl to download a file with user alice and then bob Note the difference in the Average Dload column (the average download speed).
Bandwidth limiting result

Compression

We can configure NGINX's compression settings in its main http block, typically in the /etc/nginx/nginx.conf file.
http {
...
gzip on;
gzip_vary on; # Add Vary: Accept-Encoding header
gzip_proxied any; # Compress data for all proxied requests
...
}
See the NGINX gzip module documentation for more information.

HTTPS

NGINX can be configured to serve HTTPS traffic. This is recommended for production deployments. See NGINX HTTPS configuration for more information.

Caching

NGINX can be configured to cache responses from booster-http. Since booster-http serves content addressed data that does not change, this is particularly well suited to caching in cases where certain content is frequently requested. booster-http sets a long Cache-Control header by default, so NGINX will cache responses for a long time by default.
See the NGINX proxy module documentation for more information on how to configure caching.